Yougsters Looking for Careers  

  RSS

DaveB
Estimable Member
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 246
03/09/2017 8:49 am  

The other day I attended to Jaywick Sands Forum meeting, at which a lady from Essex County Council spoke very passionately about her commitment to helping Young Adults, 16 - 18, find employment and training by bringing together the resources of different agencies to assist them in their ambition.

I'm rarely impressed with speeches by ECC staff, but this particular lady, Lisa, made it very clear that just by having the knowledge of how to muster the various agency resources was not earth shattering but made those small differences that can help get people into a career.

So if you know a youngster in your family or a friend or acquaintance it may be worth passing on the attached details.

Attachment removed
Edited: 3 months  ago

Maureen S liked
ReplyQuote
Viv S
Prominent Member
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 926
03/09/2017 8:55 am  

Remember them going into school when our son was finishing his exams, they also had a careers officer on site for about a month.  Good to see something is still active and there is some committed involved.


DaveB liked
ReplyQuote
Lis B
Reputable Member Moderator
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 262
08/09/2017 6:32 pm  

When I was at school (all girls) we had a visitor one afternoon. "What are you going to be when you leave school? " she asked  "Nurse, hairdresser, teacher, air hostess" were the answers, as we had no idea of career possibilities.  That was it. As soon as everyone had given their answer she left.  I'm pleased that more information is given by careers advisors these days.


DaveB liked
ReplyQuote
DaveB
Estimable Member
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 246
08/09/2017 7:54 pm  

Lis, The advice does seem to be available, but unless someone gives you a point of contact, like so many things these days it seems to be wrapped up in Red Tape.

I know when I left school, I was lucky that I had managed to secure an apprenticeship with Ford, but it was at a time when being able to produce paper qualifications seemed less important than the demeanour of the individual, plus there seemed to be more jobs around.

These days the absence of good exam results seems to be a bar to even to most basic jobs, never mind a career, I think the main thing that Lisa was trying to emphasise was that a lack of good school results and not wishing to go into pure further education should not limit the choices of the school leaver if the relevant services can be accessed.


Jackie C, Rob S, Maureen S and 2 people liked
ReplyQuote
Jackie C
Reputable Member
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 355
09/09/2017 5:30 pm  

Sounds like us girls were brought up to be housewives, back in the day, I went to an all girls school too Lis and your recollection is exactly same as I recall, but there were no shortage of jobs and a lot of choice too. Leave one job and straight into another. How times have changed for teenagers trying to find employment now. Even further education doesnt guarantee anywork. Some of them dont stand a chance.


DaveB liked
ReplyQuote
Viv S
Prominent Member
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 926
10/09/2017 10:50 am  

Interesting.....I was at an all girls school in London and we had an individual appointment with a Careers Officer just after we finished our GCEs, as they used to be in the 60s.  I remember her asking me what my favourite subjects were, looking at my school report book and asking what I liked doing.  I didnt have a lot of time to think about it so said reading.  There was no discussion about what job I wanted to do, any aspirations etc.  Within a few weeks I had a letter inviting me for an interview at a main Library, got the job and started mid summer holidays.  Dont ever remember having  or knowing I had a choice until I was at the Library for a couple of months.  Never had time to read a book and I would get told to be quiet all the time..... I was only 16 years old.   I had to walk through a dark park to get to the underground on late nights about 8pm.  Didnt stay there long, got an office job with a great lively bunch of people at a fashion house.  Much better

Edited: 3 months  ago

Maureen S and DaveB liked
ReplyQuote
Jackie C
Reputable Member
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 355
11/09/2017 9:48 am  

Think my problem with education was I absolutely hated school and couldn't wait to leave, which was 15, did get one GCE Art, only because they said I could enter it early. I wanted to earn 'money,' London here I come,, haha. (The swinging 60s).  I carried on my education in my 30's, I wanted my exams  then, mansged to get 8 bits of 'paper',so I put it all down to the level of the teachers and how they engage the pupils, think its still relevant today, the brighter ones get on and the slower ones or disruptive are not engaged enough or overlooked, but I could be completely wrong and I do think the teachers have a hard job, I couldn't do it. Hate to admit it, but my class made a teacher cry, horrid girls.

 

,

Edited: 3 months  ago

DaveB, Glo, Rob S and 2 people liked
ReplyQuote
Glo
 Glo
Trusted Member
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 85
11/09/2017 7:57 pm  

My sister and I both passed the 11 plus (she is 2 years older than me) and I followed her to a Convent High School.  I used to come 1st every year in junior school so I thought it would be a breeze in High School.   Bit of a rude awakening as the other girls in my class were very clever.  I really had to apply myself and used to come top in RE and nearly top in French, English language and English literature.  The majority of teachers were nuns and some of them were lovely but the others were absolutely horrible, spiteful and downright nasty.  I remember the nun who taught RE and despite me coming 1st she hated me.  She stopped me sitting with my best friend and made me sit at the front right under her evil nose.  We were not allowed to wear any jewellery and she pulled one of my friends out of her chair and told her to take her tiny stud earrings out.  She refused so this nun slapped my friend around the face so hard you could see the fingermarks for ages afterwards.  
Anyway I was in the netball team from the start and I loved that so much.  I was awarded my netball colours and could not have been prouder.  I learned to type at school but oh boy we could be so naughty sometimes.  This is going on a bit so I shall make it shorter in a later post.


DaveB, Lis B and Viv S liked
ReplyQuote
Viv S
Prominent Member
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 926
12/09/2017 5:55 pm  
Posted by: Glo

My sister and I both passed the 11 plus (she is 2 years older than me) and I followed her to a Convent High School.  I used to come 1st every year in junior school so I thought it would be a breeze in High School.   Bit of a rude awakening as the other girls in my class were very clever.  I really had to apply myself and used to come top in RE and nearly top in French, English language and English literature.  The majority of teachers were nuns and some of them were lovely but the others were absolutely horrible, spiteful and downright nasty.  I remember the nun who taught RE and despite me coming 1st she hated me.  She stopped me sitting with my best friend and made me sit at the front right under her evil nose.  We were not allowed to wear any jewellery and she pulled one of my friends out of her chair and told her to take her tiny stud earrings out.  She refused so this nun slapped my friend around the face so hard you could see the fingermarks for ages afterwards.  
Anyway I was in the netball team from the start and I loved that so much.  I was awarded my netball colours and could not have been prouder.  I learned to type at school but oh boy we could be so naughty sometimes.  This is going on a bit so I shall make it shorter in a later post.

Reminded me of the Convent School nearby when I was at Junior School, I seriously thought the Nuns glided along on air........used to scare me witless!  That was until a catholic friend of mine told me she had seen their big boots and thick stockings so they couldnt pick their feet up to walk properly.......made me laugh and was never scared of them again.  She also said they were wicked women most of the time

Edited: 3 months  ago

DaveB, Maureen S and Glo liked
ReplyQuote
Glo
 Glo
Trusted Member
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 85
12/09/2017 7:27 pm  

My school was so strict and we were all frightened of  the teachers that I don't know how were brave enough to misbehave occasionally.  We were given the chance to take one GCE at 14 and I got my Greek Literature. I didn't hate school, it gave me a wonderful education but because every summer holiday I worked full time and adored it I was itching to leave asap. I left at 15 and my sister stayed on until 18.  In those days you could get a job so easily I was never out of work.  I ended up working as a legal secretary and I stayed in that profession for about 30 years until I retired early.  I haven't told you about the naughty things we got up to at school but I never seemed to get caught!


DaveB and Viv S liked
ReplyQuote
Jackie C
Reputable Member
Joined:10 months  ago
Posts: 355
13/09/2017 8:35 am  

Yes my Headteacher,ruled with a rod of iron and the cane. Had chalk thrown at me, man -handled and thrown out of class, stood in main hallway for everyone to see I had been naughty. I do remember having on one school report, 'Jacqueline won't be told, and thinks her way is best', what did they expect I was a rebellious  teenager, trouble is the rebellion has stuck with me 😂


DaveB, Glo and Lis B liked
ReplyQuote
  
Working

Please Login or Register