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Maureen S
(@maureen-s)
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15/11/2018 6:30 pm  

Interesting times, politically, what next??


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Paul Middleton
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16/11/2018 12:48 am  
Posted by: Maureen S

Interesting times, politically, what next??

Well what ever it is,I hope Traitor May's not in charge of it 😡  😠  😬 


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Maureen S
(@maureen-s)
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16/11/2018 8:11 am  

She lives in a world of her own!


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Josie B
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16/11/2018 10:14 am  

I don't see how she can justify us staying in the customs union, when she always promised that we will come out of it.


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Maureen S
(@maureen-s)
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16/11/2018 12:47 pm  

She can't justify it Josie!


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Rob S
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16/11/2018 12:50 pm  

If we stay in the customs union it defeats the the whole point of leaving as we won't be able to negotiate new deals with other countries.


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JohnBY
(@johnby)
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25/11/2018 5:37 pm  

EU bullies and lack of true democracy.

Taken from:-

https://www.eyeonspain.com/blogs/spainnews/18741/gibraltar-stealth-clause-could-mean-spain-blocks-brexit.aspx

Best view on Brexit I've heard to date..

Aussie (ex PM) Tony Abbott sums it up beautifully !----- (If it resonates and you feel others may like to contemplate its sentiment, copy and paste far and wide)

It’s pretty hard for Britain’s friends, here in Australia, to make sense of the mess that’s being made of Brexit. The referendum result was perhaps the biggest-ever vote of confidence in the United Kingdom, its past and its future. But the British establishment doesn’t seem to share that confidence and instead looks desperate to cut a deal, even if that means staying under the rule of Brussels. Looking at this from abroad, it’s baffling: the country that did the most to bring democracy into the modern world might yet throw away the chance to take charge of its own destiny.

Let’s get one thing straight: a negotiation that you’re not prepared to walk away from is not a negotiation — it’s surrender. It’s all give and no get. When David Cameron tried to renegotiate Britain’s EU membership, he was sent packing because Brussels judged (rightly) that he’d never actually back leaving. And since then, Brussels has made no real concessions to Theresa May because it judges (rightly, it seems) that she’s desperate for whatever deal she can get.

The EU’s palpable desire to punish Britain for leaving vindicates the Brexit project. Its position, now, is that there’s only one ‘deal’ on offer, whereby the UK retains all of the burdens of EU membership but with no say in setting the rules. The EU seems to think that Britain will go along with this because it’s terrified of no deal. Or, to put it another way, terrified of the prospect of its own independence.

But even after two years of fearmongering and vacillation, it’s not too late for robust leadership to deliver the Brexit that people voted for. It’s time for Britain to announce what it will do if the EU can’t make an acceptable offer by March 29 next year — and how it would handle no deal. Freed from EU rules, Britain would automatically revert to world trade, using rules agreed by the World Trade Organization. It works pretty well for Australia. So why on earth would it not work just as well for the world’s fifth-largest economy?

A world trade Brexit lets Britain set its own rules. It can say, right now, that it will not impose any tariff or quota on European produce and would recognise all EU product standards. That means no border controls for goods coming from Europe to Britain. You don’t need to negotiate this: just do it. If Europe knows what’s in its own best interests, it would fully reciprocate in order to maintain entirely free trade and full mutual recognition of standards right across Europe.

Next, the UK should declare that Europeans already living here should have the right to remain permanently — and, of course, become British citizens if they wish. This should be a unilateral offer. Again, you don’t need a deal. You don’t need Michel Barnier’s permission. If Europe knows what’s best for itself, it would likewise allow Britons to stay where they are.

Third, there should continue to be free movement of people from Europe into Britain — but with a few conditions. Only for work, not welfare. And with a foreign worker’s tax on the employer, to make sure anyone coming in would not be displacing British workers.

Fourth, no ‘divorce bill’ whatsoever should be paid to Brussels. The UK government would assume the EU’s property and liabilities in Britain, and the EU would assume Britain’s share of these in Europe. If Britain was getting its fair share, these would balance out; and if Britain wasn’t getting its fair share, it’s the EU that should be paying Britain.

Finally, there’s no need on Britain’s part for a hard border with Ireland. Britain wouldn’t be imposing tariffs on European goods, so there’s no money to collect. The UK has exactly the same product standards as the Republic, so let’s not pretend you need to check for problems we all know don’t exist. Some changes may be needed but technology allows for smart borders: there was never any need for a Cold War-style Checkpoint Charlie. Irish citizens, of course, have the right to live and work in the UK in an agreement that long predates EU membership.

Of course, the EU might not like this British leap for independence. It might hit out with tariffs and impose burdens on Britain as it does on the US — but WTO rules put a cap on any retaliatory action. The worst it can get? We’re talking levies of an average 4 or 5 per cent. Which would be more than offset by a post-Brexit devaluation of the pound (which would have the added bonus of making British goods more competitive everywhere).

UK officialdom assumes that a deal is vital, which is why so little thought has been put into how Britain might just walk away. Instead, officials have concocted lurid scenarios featuring runs on the pound, gridlock at ports, grounded aircraft, hoarding of medicines and flights of investment. It’s been the pre-referendum Project Fear campaign on steroids. And let’s not forget how employment, investment and economic growth ticked up after the referendum.

As a former prime minister of Australia and a lifelong friend of your country, I would say this: Britain has nothing to lose except the shackles that the EU imposes on it. After the courage shown by its citizens in the referendum, it would be a tragedy if political leaders go wobbly now. Britain’s future has always been global, rather than just with Europe. Like so many of Britain’s admirers, I want to see this great country seize this chance and make the most of it.

Tony Abbott served as Prime Minister of Australia from 2013 to 2015.


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Paul Middleton
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25/11/2018 9:36 pm  

I wonder if there is a lamp post reserved for Traitor May somewhere? If there is,hopefully it's next to the one allocated to Tony Bliar.  😡 😠


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Rob S
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25/11/2018 10:42 pm  
Posted by: Paul Middleton

I wonder if there is a lamp post reserved for Traitor May somewhere? If there is,hopefully it's next to the one allocated to Tony Bliar.  😡 😠

Stong stuff Paul. I just hope the deal was meant to fail so that we could escape the EU completely and adopt WTO rules and in so doing gain some credibility for the government. I'm probably dreaming though!


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Maureen S
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25/11/2018 10:55 pm  

No harm in dreaming!


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Josie B
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26/11/2018 1:58 pm  
Posted by: Maureen S

No harm in dreaming!

 

As long as it doesn't turn into a nightmare - which with this proposal, it would.


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Rob S
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26/11/2018 2:34 pm  

I saw a list of Tory MP's who have said they will vote against this deal but our MP is not there. I have emailed him about this and it would be good if as many as possible did. Our constituency was strongly in favour of leaving so he should support that view surely and not just toe the party line!


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Josie B
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27/11/2018 8:38 am  

I'm not surprised that Giles has gone quiet. I've attached a copy of his latest missive about the Brexit deal. He's probably trying to find a way to dodge what he stated.


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Maureen S
(@maureen-s)
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27/11/2018 8:58 am  

Thanks for that Josie!


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Rogina
(@rogina)
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27/11/2018 8:43 pm  

So true


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Stuart Austin
(@stuart-austin)
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28/11/2018 8:47 am  

He's siding with May on this. Petrified she will parachute another Tory MP in to replace him.
Giles always sits on the fence, he's a yes man and i won't be voting for him nor any Tory in any further elections.
Accepting this deal would mean the EU are still in control, we'll still be paying Billions, they'll then demand access to our waters and there will be nothing we can do or say as we would have signed our rights away. 
You can see his Brexit statement here-->  https://www.gileswatling.co.uk/news/update-brexit-statement  

Owner of www.iFix-YourPC.com
Local PC Laptop Repair covering Tendring.


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Josie B
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28/11/2018 1:12 pm  

Stuart, this is the same statement I posted from him earlier. It does state that he can't accept an open ended backstop. "The EU and the Government must, therefore, guarantee that an agreement on our Future Relationship is in place before the end of the transition period, and this guarantee needs to be included in the Withdrawal Agreement. I have made those feelings known to the Prime Minister, and this will have a significant influence on my vote when this matter is put before the House."


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JohnBY
(@johnby)
Eminent Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 39
30/11/2018 11:57 am  

Brexit:-

I am feed up with all the downs and the worst possible outcome of the brexit that is coming from the government and the bank of England and others. No news or comments about all the good stuff. It is like wishing to have a baby for years and then when it is about to happen, instead of been reminded of all the lovely, fantastic moments to come. You are told of all the down side and consequences. “The frustration and disputes and late night worrying and the cost. Over the next 5, 10, 20 and more years to come”. I want out of the EU, and I was sceptical of the original idea of the common market, but feel it was a good idea of the free trade arrangement. But now what comes across as a dictatorship and lose of freedom and true democracy for our country.

But I am worried that while, I don’t like the current exit proposal deal. What could happen if it is rejected and we end up with a new referendum and if we lose it.!!!! We would be in a far worse position. So is the current exit proposal the best ?? I am unsure, it does give some possibility, but rejection could be far worse. I am still pondering the potential outcome of the little plus against the big negative effect it could have, if rejected. ?????

The bank of England did say that if we voted for a brexit the £ would be devalued, but they were wrong and it increased in value so. What now ??


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Josie B
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30/11/2018 12:39 pm  

JohnBy, I am not worried if we crash out with no deal. We would then be able to trade under WTO rules, so not much would change. Carney, The Bank of England governor, has been wrong on every pronouncement he has made so far, probably because he states what the government wants to hear.


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Rob S
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30/11/2018 1:18 pm  

Theresa May is a huge disappointment as PM. I can't believe how many times she has lied to us along with others such as Carney. I see that Tim Martin on Question Time spelled out the good points about leaving and trading under WTO rules. Why would we not like saving £39 billion and cutting tarrifs on thousands of goods! The government could make a very good case for leaving properly if they wanted to.


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